A STRYDE in the right direction for Africa’s rural youth

18 November

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Photo: Random Institute

Did you know that millions of young Africans are struggling to find work? Nearly three quarters of youth in Sub-Saharan Africa live on less than US$2 per day, and more than a quarter neither work nor study.

This problem is exacerbated in rural areas. Sub-Saharan Africa has the world’s youngest and fastest growing population, with the rural population estimated to increase by 150 million people by 2050. Yet just a quarter of the 10-12 million new jobs required are being created each year.

STRYDE

Photo: Random Institute

So, how can Africa’s rural youth contribute to the economy in this environment?

Well, in 2011, TechnoServe and The MasterCard Foundation partnered up to help rural people in East Africa do just that. Together they founded the Strengthening Rural Youth Development through Enterprise (STRYDE) programme, which has delivered skills training, business development, and mentoring young people aged 18-30 in Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda.

INFORMAL ECONOMY AND SKILLS TRAINING

It is true that in rural areas it is difficult to find one activity that can provide a sustainable livelihood. Which explains why STRYDE graduates engage in 2.3 different income-earning activities at any one time.

To do this successfully, young people need to be confident, self-aware, entrepreneurial and open to different opportunities.

Therefore, STRYDE’s three-month training is designed to help young people identify the opportunities around them. Then, once identified, they must learn to apply:

  • self-efficacy;
  • personal finance;
  • entrepreneurship;
  • and agribusiness.

STRYDE students are then provided with nine months aftercare, tailored to their interests and the opportunities they identified.

STRYDE VS. THE SKILLS GAP

By upskilling Africa’s rural youth, STRYDE has achieved the following:

  • 15,552 young people have successfully graduated from the programme, the majority of which are in profitable employment;
  • Incomes have increased by 133% on average;
  • and 90% are now saving regularly;
  • 30% are currently running micro- and small-enterprises;
  • 37% work in farming;
  • 11% earn wages;
  • and 6% are studying again.

Photo: Random Institute

29 November 2019
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA Did you know that millions of young Africans are struggling to find work? Nearly three quarters of youth in Sub-Saharan Africa live on less than US$2 per day, and more than a quarter neither work nor study. This problem is exacerbated in rural areas. Sub-Saharan Africa has the world’s youngest and fastest growing […]

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