ILO on Green Jobs

24 September

Following our post – ‘Fast Facts on Green Jobs’ – we found that the International Labour Organisation (ILO) have done extensive research on green skills.

Here’s a brief look at some of that research.

ILO and CEDEFOP

In 2011, ILO and Cedefop’s review of 21 countries found a significant skills gap in green sector jobs. From renewable energy to manufacturing, employees trained both by higher academic institutions and vocational programmes, were found to lack the competencies required.

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

To fix the mismatch, countries are writing skills-related clauses directly into new eco-legislation. A 2016 ILO survey of 27 countries saw that 19 had set-up platforms for vocational training. Even so, in 2018, it found that there is no consensus on what green skills are really needed.

KEES VAN DER REE

ILO researcher in charge of green jobs, Kees Van Der Ree, found that countries such with well-established labour market policies and effective TVET institutions in the private sector (such as France and Germany), have adapted more quickly to the demand for green skills.

HOW IS THE GREEN ECONOMY AFFECTING EMPLOYMENT?

According to the ILO, the move towards a green economy is affecting employment through:

  1. Structural Changes – greater demand for some jobs and lower demand for others.
  2. Adjustments to Education and Training
  3. Creation of New Professions/Skills Profiles

HOW IS THE GREEN ECONOMY AFFECTING THE LABOUR MARKET?

The ILO predicts that the following 8 sectors will see the most change as we move to a greener economy:

  1. Agriculture
  2. Forest Industries
  3. Fisheries
  4. Energy
  5. Manufacturing
  6. Recycling
  7. Construction
  8. Transport

WHAT ARE GREEN JOBS?

The ILO defines green jobs as jobs that “[contribute] to preserving or restoring the quality of the environment while also meeting the criteria for decent work – adequate wages, safe conditions, workers’ rights, social dialogue and social protection.”

The definition of green jobs can be fluid.

The ILO reminds us that, as “the transition to a green economy intensifies, what is considered a green job today might not continue to be so regarded. The understanding of green jobs also varies from one country to another.”

As we transition to green jobs, the ILO reminds us that “govt support to workers/enterprises in the process of restructuring will be essential” for protecting adversely affected groups. This means proactive labour policies, greater entrepreneurship and more diver economies.

DO YOU WANT TO CULTIVATE GREEN SKILLS?

Spare an hour to take this workshop to learn about in-demand sustainable development skills sets.

29 November 2019
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ

Following our post – ‘Fast Facts on Green Jobs’ – we found that the International Labour Organisation (ILO) have done extensive research on green skills. Here’s a brief look at some of that research. ILO and CEDEFOP In 2011, ILO and Cedefop’s review of 21 countries found a significant skills gap in green sector jobs. […]

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