1 October

Mission: Talent Leadership Members debated how to nurture future skills at the WorldSkills Kazan Conference

During the WorldSkills Conference, Mission: Talent Leadership Board members debated TVET skills in the future labour market at the WorldSkills Kazan Conference in August.

SKILLS MISMATCH RATHER THAN SKILLS GAP

According to Anton Stepanenko, Senior Partner at BCG Russia, the talent deficit does not mean that the talent does not exist. In fact, it is probably employed elsewhere – either in another location or industry, meaning that 1.3 billion workers are either under- or over-qualified for their jobs. That is, 2 out of 5 employees.

“[The skills mismatch] is a hidden productivity tax that virtually all employees in the world pay … overall, it contributes to a total of $5 trillion in GDP – 6% of the planet’s total.”‬

Director for Skills the European Commission, Manuela Geleng, added another scary stat to the mix:

“70% of employers in Europe struggle to invest because they can’t find the right skills. We need to focus more on the link between industry, training institutions, innovation and research.‬”

TACKLING THE SKILLS GAP

“There are 3 important factors to [consider when] tackling the skills gap:”

Mr Stepanenko continued,

“1) Capabilities (preparing the workforce for jobs today and tomorrow); 2. Motivation (individuals must seek opportunities); 3. Access to opportunities. As Tolstoy wrote: ‘All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.’ Similarly, all countries face their own challenges, but we also think that capabilities, motivation, and access to opportunities provides a basis for solving any problem.”

TVET SYSTEMS

Alexandria Valerio, Lead Education Specialist at the World Bank agreed, adding that:

“There are 3 important factors for TVET systems to work: 1. Leadership – without good leadership it’s very hard to get things done; 2. Trust – in an economic and social contract that improving workforce skills is going to benefit the country; and‬ 3. Hidden agendas. One-size-fits-all training, short-term training, financing poor-quality training (depending on national qualifications), and pushing students into the labour market too early are all examples of tools that do not work when it comes to supporting the workforce and TVET systems as a whole.”

MOTIVATION

Yet, Ms Geleng emphasised that the real difficult issue is that of motivation. She urged the need in finding a balance between how to anticipate skills and how to motivate people to feel responsible for their own futures.

UNESCO’s Borhene Chakroun agreed urging for lifelong learning policies to be in place to create the right environment in which people can feel motivated and find the opportunities they need to upskill.

Tatyana Terentyeva, Chief Human Resources Officer Rosatom used her company as an example of how such an environment can be created by building a corporate culture for everyday learning.

“We created 240 schools, a consortium of universities and in-house academies for training tech, hard and soft skills…our main task is to instil a habit of lifelong learning in our workforce. To me, being Future Ready means being multi-skilled, handling change, learning new things, and remaining calm and focused in new situations. Learning to learn, resilience and adaptability.”

By the end of the panel the audience at the TVET Systems for 2030 panel resoundingly voted that a human-orientated approach should be prioritised in order to tackle the skills gap. What do you think?

29 November 2019
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ

During the WorldSkills Conference, Mission: Talent Leadership Board members debated TVET skills in the future labour market at the WorldSkills Kazan Conference in August. SKILLS MISMATCH RATHER THAN SKILLS GAP According to Anton Stepanenko, Senior Partner at BCG Russia, the talent deficit does not mean that the talent does not exist. In fact, it is […]

read more