Mission: Talent was represented at two panels on women’s empowerment at the St Petersburg International Economic Forum

6 June

Women’s empowerment in the workplace is becoming an increasingly important aspect of corporate sustainability, especially when it comes to having the confidence and skills to take senior management positions. For that reason it was crucial for Mission: Talent to send one of its key representatives, Tatyana Terentyeva, Chief Human Resources Officer of ROSATOM, Russia’s nuclear energy provider, to contribute to two panels addressing this issue at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF).

The panels – Role of Women Executives in Building Successful Business Models and Equal Opportunities in the Digital Age – both focused on women’s role in the ever-changing labour market environment. As has been widely reported, The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4.0) is affecting people from all walks of life all over the world. The panels tackled  the question of how women who if they were fully empowered and equipped for the pre-digital professional age, could thrive in today’s changing labour market. What role should politicians and business leaders play in engaging and empowering more women in this fast-paced economy and what measures should they take?

Formally speaking,  there are no practical barriers to women’s professional advancement, yet the vast volume of data collected in a wide variety of studies over many years give a clear picture of inequality. Anastasia Kalinina, Head of Eurasia World Economic Forum (WEF), revealed that this year’s WEF Gender Gap Index found that, although all countries were making slow progress in closing the gender gap, it will take over 100 years to do so if we continue at our current pace. However, according to Irina Gaida, who is a partner at PwC’s Strategy&, companies with more than three women on their management board generate greater profit. What then prevents businesses from empowering more women and what can be done to change the tide?

Business leaders on both panels shared the practices they adopted to support their workforce.

“Our ‘talent ecosystem’ has allowed for 30% of our leadership positions to go to women. By nurturing talent from as young as kindergarten we not only cultivate curiosity in STEM but build the confidence that young minds require to grow in the industry,” said Tatyana Terentyeva.

Microsoft enjoys similar successes with women in leadership positions. Doris Lippert, head of Microsoft’s Digital Advisory Services believes that this is largely due to the company’s Diverse Hiring Board, which requires the entire company, across boards and teams, to make hiring decisions collectively.

“The reality is such that where women are present, there are more opportunities opened up to young girls. This is why a human-centred approach is key, to give opportunities to all,” concluded Terentyeva.

If you would like any more information on the panels or to watch the live broadcasts, please click on their hyperlinked titles in the body of this article.

If you would like to be part of future panel discussions, have your say, or be in-the-know on all things skills, then follow us on twitter and Facebook @MissionTalent19.

29 November 2019
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ
Kazan Declaration: AVAILABLE TO READ

Women’s empowerment in the workplace is becoming an increasingly important aspect of corporate sustainability, especially when it comes to having the confidence and skills to take senior management positions. For that reason it was crucial for Mission: Talent to send one of its key representatives, Tatyana Terentyeva, Chief Human Resources Officer of ROSATOM, Russia’s nuclear […]

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